Kapwa Collective

The Kapwa Collective is a group of Filipino Canadian artists, critical thinkers, and healers who work across different academic and applied disciplines. We believe in the values of inclusivity and accessibility, and we work towards bridging narratives between the Indigenous and the Diasporic, and the Filipino and the Canadian. We facilitate links among academic, artistic, activist, and other communities in Toronto.
Mon
16
2014

punzaramba:

PUNZARamba Artist Family have been hosting out T’BOLI artists from Lake Sebu, Philippines. Together with Kapwa Collective the T’BOLI artist are here in Toronto as part of a cultural exchange.  We’ll be posting more photos as they immerse in our city of Toronto. Stay tune for events, speaker series, performances and where you can purchase some T’BOLI products.

Mon
09
2014

Kapwa Collective co-presents Dreamweaving: T’nalak

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June 9, 2014 ~ Kapwa Collective is honoured to welcome our special guests from the T’boli Schools of Living Traditions in Lake Sebu, South Cotabato, Philippines ~ Oyog, Buwat and Andi.

Please join us for TBOLIxTO - A Cultural Exchange between the T’boli School of Living Traditions (Philippines) and communities in Toronto.

Our first TBOLIxTO event is…

Dreamweaving: T’nalak
Thursday June 12
OCAD University
100 McCaul St
6:30 - 8:30 PM
Room 600 
Free event

Dreamweaving: Tnalak is an opportunity to develop an awareness of T’boli material culture, living traditions, and their leadership role in advocating for the rights of Indigenous people in the Philippines.


FB page: https://www.facebook.com/events/804689546215929

Sat
31
2014

Kulintang Healing Garden

Kapwa Collective presents the Kulintang Healing Garden

Kapwa Collective has created a Kulintang Healing Garden for Restless Precinct – a site specific, group exhibition and performance series in Scarborough’s Guildwood Park.

The Kulintang Healing Garden bridges Indigenous knowledges, systems and practices from our Philippine heritage, with our identities as settlers on Turtle Island.

The focal point of our project is the kulintang, a traditional gong instrument indigenous to the T’boli, Maranao, Maguindanao, and Palawan Peoples of the Philippines.

Kapwa Collective recognizes the need to build healing relationships and connections with nature, and fellow human beings that are rooted in a recognition of our shared identities—and futures—in this era of deep ecological crises.

In 2012, after attending the KAPWA-3 conference in Baguio, Philippines, Kapwa Collective went to Ilocos Sur, Philippines. We were taught how to plant native Philippine trees for the purpose of healing the earth and ourselves. We planted tree saplings with intent and in respectful dialogue with the land.

In celebration of these kapwa values, we invite the community to make plantable paper; jam with singing plants and kulintang gongs; and plant seeds that nourish our indigenous selves on our paths towards decolonization.

SCHEDULE:
First round of activities: 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Second round of activities: 3:30 PM – 5:30 PM

Free. All ages welcome. Meet us at the Greenhouse!

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ABOUT US:
Kapwa Collective is a group of Filipino Canadian artists, critical thinkers, and healers whose work bridges narratives between the Indigenous and the Diasporic, the Filipino and the Canadian. We function as a mutual support group based on the core value of kapwa.

Kapwa is loosely translated as “a recognition of shared identity, an inner self shared with others” (Enriquez 52). It is the core concept of Sikolohiyang Pilipino or Filipino Psychology, a movement that is rooted in the experiences, ideas, and consciousness of Filipinos. Formed in 2012, Kapwa Collective facilitates links among academic, artistic, activist, and other communities in Toronto.

For the Restless Precinct exhibition, we are represented by artists: Jo SiMalaya Alcampo, Christine Balmes and Jennifer Maramba.

Reference:
Enriquez, Virgilio G. From Colonial to Liberation Psychology: The Philippine Experience. Quezon City: The University of the Philippines Press, 2008.

STAY CONNECTED:
<http://kapwacollective.tumblr.com/restlessprecinct>
<http://restlessprecinct.ca/>

RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/637902712951376

Wed
07
2014

Kapwa Collective co-presents Grace Nono in Toronto

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Caña Caridad Foundation in community partnership with Kapisanan Philippine Centre for Arts & Culture & Kapwa Collective proudly present:

A Talk and Performance with GRACE NONO
With special guest: Pantayo Kulintang Ensemble

Saturday May 24, 2014
Doors at 7:30 PM || Show at 8:00 PM
St. John’s Cathedral (Toronto)
186 Cowan Ave (Queen St. W. & Dufferin Ave.)

<www.gracenono.com>

Grace Nono is an internationally celebrated Filipino singer, author, and cultural worker. Born and raised in the river valley of Agusan, Northeastern Mindanao, Southern Philippines, Grace specializes in the contemporary performance of Philippine sung oral/aural traditions-with special focus on songs with sacred themes-taught to her by oralists/auralists from different parts of the Philippines.

She has been featured in numerous concerts internationally, including the Cultural Center of the Philippines (Manila), the House of World Cultures (Berlin), the Circulo de Bellas Artes (Madrid), and the World Exposition on Nature’s Wisdom (Nagoya). She has also published six award-winning solo albums, and also co-produced and co-published together with composer Bob Aves, five recordings of Philippine oral/aural music traditions.

Most notably as an author, Grace has published two books (with accompanying recordings): The Shared Voice: Chanted and Spoken Narratives from the Philippines (2008) and Song of the Babaylan: Living Voices, Medicines, Spiritualities of Philippine Ritualist-Oralist-Healers (2013).

As cultural worker, Grace founded the Tao Foundation for Culture and Arts, a Philippine non-government organization engaged in cultural regeneration and grassroots development initiatives.

We are honoured to welcome Grace Nono to Toronto for a one-evening only talk and performance.

Limited general seating tickets available now.

CONTACT:
Lilac Cana – lilac.cana@gmail.com
Kapisanan – kat@kapisanancentre.com
Kapwa Collective – kapwacollective@gmail.com

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ABOUT CANA CARIDAD FOUNDATION.
The Cana Caridad Foundation supports charitable organizations worldwide, including Free The Children, the IMQH Missionaries (Cebu, Philippines), and FOSSSI (Filipino-Ontario Seminarian Scholarship Society International).

ABOUT KAPISANAN.
Kapisanan Philippine Centre for Arts & Culture (or KAPISANAN or The K) is Canada’s premiere Filipino-Canadian arts & cultural facility located in Toronto. Housed inside Toronto’s Kensington Market district is Kapisanan Philippine Centre for Arts & Culture’s 3500 sq ft headquarters. We are youth-led incorporated charitable organization with an inter-generational sphere. Our mission is to promote the social and professional development of Filipino youth, artists, and entrepreneurs, using Filipino culture and knowledge-of-self as a foundation for empowerment — for the whole community! Armed with an appetite for creative endeavors and community advancement, here at the K, we eat art and inspiration.

ABOUT KAPWA COLLECTIVE.
KAPWA Collective is a group of Filipino-Canadian artists, critical thinkers, and healers who work towards bridging narratives between the Indigenous and the Diasporic and between the Filipino and the Canadian. KAPWA Collective has created a Kulintang Healing Garden that bridges Indigenous knowledges, systems and practices from our Philippine heritage to our identities as settlers on Turtle Island. The focal point of our project is the kulintang, a traditional gong instrument indigenous to the T’boli, Maranao, Maguindanao, and Palawan Peoples of the Philippines. The Kulintang Healing Garden features interactive installation, music jams, and dialogical art to engage the community. For more information visit: <www.kapwacollective.tumblr
.com>

IMAGE:  Photo by Isa Lorenzo
Poster Design: Huda Tariq and Kat Estacio


The calligraphy in the background is written in a script called Baybayin. It is an indigenous pre-colonial writing system from the islands known as the Philippines.

The script spells out the following words, as they relate to Grace Nono, her role in the community, and the objective of this event:
Babaylan (priestess, community leader)
Pamana (heritage, legacy)
Taytayan (Bisaya word for bridge)

Mon
28
2014

Kapwa Collective & Restless Precinct

"Restless Precinct is a site specific, group exhibition and performance series developed by curatorial collective SUM°, which transforms Scarborough’s Guildwood Park through engagement with the landscape, architectural fragments and communities that populate and absent the site. Through multiple creative interventions, artists re-imagine the material and ideological foundations of The Guild, producing counter-histories of place, home, and memory. The exhibition will run Saturday May 17- Saturday June 14, 2014.

http://restlessprecinct.ca

KAPWA Collective’s Kulintang Healing Garden bridges Indigenous knowledges, systems and practices from our Philippine heritage to our identities as settlers on Turtle Island. With the focal point of the kulintang, a traditional gong instrument indigenous to the T’boli, Maranao, Maguindanao, and Palawan Peoples of the Philippines, Kulintang Healing Garden will feature interactive installation, music jams, and dialogical art to engage the community around the greenhouse.

KAPWA Collective is represented at Restless Precinct by Jo SiMalaya Alcampo, Christine Balmes, and Jennifer Maramba.

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for more info > > http://kapwacollective.tumblr.com/restlessprecinct

Mon
24
2014

Many meanings of k a p w a !

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“…Discover the loom of reality that is intricately woven in relationship…Polarized positions actually work in cooperative alliance. In cooperations all polarities serve as backgrounds for full appreciation of one another and the whole.

“…Look for the gifts within your relationships. Investigate the polarities between them, and explore the natural lines of force and growth they create.”

~Ariel Spilsbury & Michael Bryner from The Mayan Oracle: Return Path to the Stars 

via http://www.mysticmamma.com

Sat
15
2014

B a h a l a ~ n a

“We understand that all of us, been planting seeds together, been weaving our dreams together…Just like a farmer waiting patiently for his rice field for the right season for Harvesting…therefore, we are all still waiting…In behalf of the Schools of Living Tradition (SLT) we still help to WEAVE our DREAMs together, in a positive Spirit!”

  ~ OYOG, From the T’Boli SLT to the Toronto community

+ + + + + +

Due to unforeseen delays in securing our indigenous guests’ visas, the TBOLI x TORONTO Cultural exchange is on standby.  Kapwa Collective is actively working on rescheduling our events while simultaneously practicing Plan “B” or  Plan “Bahala na” (Tacit Trust).  

We appreciate your trust and community support.  We look forward to sharing more of Plan “Bahala na” as it unfolds.  Stay connected at:  www.kapwacollective.tumblr.com

For now, we would like to share what our friends at the Heritage and Arts Academies of the Philippines (H.A.P.I.) teach us about Bahala na as one of the core values of Sikolohiyang Pilipino / Filipino Psychology:

"The way Filipinos use the expression, “Bahala Na” had long been misinterpreted by foreigners as demonstrating the fatalism of a happy-go-lucky people. But Bahala has sacred undertones. Its ancient Filipino inscription divides the term into “ba’’ for woman and “la” for man. “Ha” means breath or wind - in a larger sense, spirit or God.  Bahala then is the word that pre-Christian Filipinos used for the deity.

Sikolohiyang Pilipino salvaged “Bahala Na!” from this fatalistic reputation into a value.  “Devil may care!” was transformed into “determination in the face of uncertainty” - a value that stimulates resourcefulness and the creativity to survive.  

The late Alfredo Lagmay attributed the dynamics of courage and determination to this notion of “Bahala-na!” which calls for risk taking in the face of possible failure.  Its origin lies in a social structure that challenges people to exercise their ability in coping with constant change.  This flexibility developed as a response to living along the earth’s “fire-belt” where erupting volcanoes, tidal waves, and tropical storms - an ever-restless environment— has taught its inhabitants to be resourceful and creative in order to survive.  “Bahala-na!” then, signifies an improvisatory skill.  It is a strength that helps Filipino to access the “deep source” where solutions to anything can be had.  

Read more:  http://kapwahan.wix.com/kapwahan#!text1/c1r61

Source: HERITAGE AND ARTS ACADEMIES OF THE PHILIPPINES INC. (H.A.P.I.) 
Copyright © 2012 Kapwahan

Sat
01
2014

PLEASE SHARE! Kapwa Collective's T'BOLI x TORONTO teaser video. Music by Alexander Junior, “WILD”.

http://kapwacollective.tumblr.com/post/78244253773

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